Thursday, January 26, 2012

Reality checkpoint

I'm not sure where this started, but the reports that Edson Buddle is now training with Belgian side Westerlo are flat false. He's back in Germany.

And from what I've been told, he remains an option for Everton, though I am not precisely sure how much of one.




- Greg Seltzer

19 comments:

sean said...

Yanks Abroad has an article about this with quotes from Westerlo representative Tom Nelson. I guess that's where it's coming from. Apparently (according to Nelson) they are waiting for Buddle to decide if he wants to sign. Maybe the article is incorrect. I wouldn't know.

Spirit of 78 said...

Imagine being a club in such dire shape that you're waiting for Buddle to sign.

Greg Seltzer said...

They are going to be waiting a looooooong time because it's not gonna happen.

Tom said...

Interesting to me that more yanks don't try to make it in Belgium. Good league, not too huge. Maybe a stepping stone (E.g., Gooch, possible Sacha K?)

Greg Seltzer said...

It's like the Eredivisie in many ways, but with less overall quality and no minimum non-EU salary.

Then again... it is Belgium. :D

Jay Eychaner said...

You're saying it's for the footie players who respect honest beer over drink Heineken?

Jay Eychaner said...

Speaking of "drink Heineken"... holy dumb grammar, Batman.

"... who respect honest beer rather than drink Heineken".

Greg Seltzer said...

Just so you know, the Heineken and Amstel you drink in America is not the real thing. It's kinda like buying frozen White Castles at the grocery store. The real stuff here is a lot tastier.

Greg Seltzer said...

Same goes for Grolsch.

Bryan said...

Highly debatable from my trip to USA-Holland 2 yrs ago. The only Heineken we could stand was the "Xtra Cold" kind, which froze it to the point you couldn't taste it! :)

Greg Seltzer said...

Well... I cannot speak for individual tastes, but I can tell you that it is not the same beer. The beer in the States is brewed somewhere else.

Jay Eychaner said...

Beer manufacturers on the scale of Heineken go to great lengths to ensure that a branded product made in one brewery/factory is as similar to the beer made in a different brewery/factory as possible. That's one of the things a company can afford to do when it's the third largest producer of beer in the world. The Heineken that makes it to the US is likely made in Brazil, but that doesn't mean the version of Heineken made there is perceptibly different than the version made in Netherlands.

Now, the beer that is produced elsewhere in the world and then shipped to the US has been on a boat, sloshing around in cargo boxes and then sitting for weeks at customs waiting for clearance. With a simple lager like Heineken, that's going to have a terribly negative effect on the flavor profile. Being a major manufacturer, they will limit their use of delicate components (like hop aromatics, for example) in part to cut costs, but also in order to lengthen the shelf life of the product. The end result is a beer with a very simple flavor profile, that can have defects when it's finally consumed on some distant shore.

The same thing will happen to a beer produced by a company that ISN'T a transnational, profit-fueled behemoth, of course, whether it's a Stone beer being exported to Italy, or an Orval being shipped to Chicago. In Belgium you have such a diversity of beers that (IMHO) it becomes a destination worthy of attention for that alone.

But yeah, hey, sometimes all you want is that €1 can of Jupiler from the vending machine.

Greg Seltzer said...

Heh. You just stated that the Heineken in America wasn't perceptibly different... and then proceeded to expertly explain much of exactly why it is different. :D

Like I said, not everyone has the same tastebuds, but I taste a vast difference between Amstel here (actually ON the Amstel) and one in a bar in Chicago or Dallas or Kalamazoo.

Jay Eychaner said...

Well, I'm talking about production of the beer. No one is going to make Brand Name Beer in one way for one market but a different way for another. It is the same beer... just damaged.

Greg Seltzer said...

Tomato, tomahto... in my mind, damaging beer changes it into a different beer. It's science, baby!

Jay Eychaner said...

I just moved to Berlin a month ago, and I'm having a blast exploring the world of fresh lagers. But the fact remains that these are still fairly simple flavors. Hop character is marginal at best, malt flavors are restrained, and the yeast strains being used have very little character at all. Macro-scale brews like Heineken and Amstel exist in a culture all their own.

I'm not saying they're bad -- I have a great respect for the technical side of their production. But damn, I want some caramel, and nutmeg, and toffee, and chocolate, and coffee roast. Gimme some lactic sour! Let me smell the pine and pepper from the hops. Belgium's beer culture allows for all of that to coexist with Jupiler and Carlsberg and Stella Artois.

To date, the best Dutch beer I've come across would be Pek & Veren from De Molen. If you can recommend anything, I'm all ears.

Greg Seltzer said...

I don't like dark beers. I like pilsners.

Of course, I really don't drink, can't remember the last beer I had.

Matt said...

I think Jay knows his beer. I worked at a Budweiser brewery for four years (no joke) and I just learned more from Jay in two posts than I did in 4 years in the Busch empire. You never know where NSC will take us...

Jay Eychaner said...

Oof. In retrospect, that was a bunch of soapbox babble. Sorry, folks.