Thursday, August 13, 2015

What about Bob? I'll tell you about Bob.

A full MLSS report will be up momentarily, but I can tell you that Stabæk have started fresh contract talks with coach Bob Bradley. He is set to run out of contract at year's end, but I have been told that it currently looks like a better than 50% chance he is back next season.

And for anyone who might be bummed he hasn't moved on to a more prestigious job yet, think of it this way: if they can rally for the Norwegian title, Bradley can stay and manage in the Champions League. Stabæk are seven points back with 11 to play, but have a game left with leaders Rosenborg, so don't count them out just yet.



- Greg Seltzer

19 comments:

Nicholas said...

I can't wait for you to tell me more in your rock and roll style and played out cuts of the day. Glad you have the Cardinals. Your birdies are becoming less frequent and more Americans have ins than you now.

Greg Seltzer said...

You forgot to mention that I am also just a terrible person overall. Get with the program, slacker.

david said...

How much better do you feel about yourself now, Nicholas?

dikranovich said...

Such odd responses!!! WFC! I was just hoping someone would debate the idea that two d mids is not part of American soccer DNA, because maybe it is even more a part of the DNA than counter attacking.

Greg Seltzer said...

Wrong thread. And dude, I have been arguing not to leave a single DM back there for years upon years.

dikranovich said...

maybe you should start a new thread and explain your philosophy. Are the wings going to cover this space in the midfield, or are they going to play above Dempsey? Of course it's all fluid right?

Is the team going to spread out wide, or are they going to stay compact and explode out into the attack?

Nobody plays total football anymore, certainly not in its truest sense. If wide players switch sides, which our national team does often, it is done with clarity and purpose, not as some concept of any player playing anywhere on the field, at anytime.

Greg, what you have shown me over the years, is that you are sold on the Dutch philosophy, and come hell or high water, you want to see its ideals imposed on our U.S. National team.

total football wasn't even invented by th Dutch, the early coaches of Ajax were English.

Greg Seltzer said...

Again, wrong thread. Next one gets binned.

And, dude... the early Ajax coaches did not do Total Football. That only came several decades later. Get real for one second, would ya?

dikranovich said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Paul Poenicke said...

Change of topic...JK is rightfully getting heat for the Gold Cup and his management of the player pool. I have read several names floated among soccer journalists and writers on twitter as replacements for JK, including Bob Bradley. I don't think there is an MLS coach I would want to replace JK, given that these coaches don't have the required international experience or the record of improving a full squad from youth to first team. Arena and Bradley already had their time as head of the USMNT and both displayed major limitations in the job, beyond the fact that records of national team coaches are generally inferior beyond a first term. JK's term has not gone well, but I hope that his strength of seeing the bigger picture and developing coaches to overcome his weaknesses can resolve our current problem.s

dikranovich said...

Paul, do you have criteria, for what coach klinsmann needs to do to keep his position? For me, he needs to win the Mexico game, and if not, he needs to advance out of the group stages next summer. If he failed at both of these causes, he would have to be replaced, and if he was, it would be in a pinch, and if Bielsa weren't available, Bruce arena would have to be at the top of the list, and maybe even over someone with such international quality.

If Bruce arena wins a concacaf champions league, that would mean a lot

Greg Seltzer said...

@ Paul:

I think you should expect Bradley to stick with the club game for a while.

Paul Poenicke said...

@dikranovich: Excellent question. Beating Mexico--a team with its own trouble--should the first requirement on the list. A close loss in a well-played game puts JK in trouble but is not a fireable offense. Advancing in qualifying is another requirement; qualifying in style--not being out passed, possessed, showing quality in attack and defense--should be another criterion. Quality play in friendlies is important as well, and one might throw in success by the youth teams. JK is responsible for those squads as well, and it is one of his strengths that he can improve programs that makes him superior other candidates. If we don't beat Mexico and look horrible in qualifying, unless the squad is with JK, I replace him with Arena until a better coach can be found, Bielsa getting the first call after telling JK goodbye.

dikranovich said...

Yeah, except Bielsa will probably be mexicos coach by the time the October game rolls around

Dany Tzvi said...

ill reiterate the point i made last time somebody mentioned bob to the nats

ussf tossed bob out quite unceremoniously. after a moderately successful tenure, he was fired for losing to mexico in the gold cup final (like we've never done that before). the tone was also inappropriate, as ussf hailed JK as someone who would revolutionize US soccer, basically branding bradley as obsolete.

bob is a pretty serene guy, but id be surprised to see him work under sunil gulati again.

dikranovich said...

Dany, this is professional soccer we are talking about, not a sorority rush party. Bob Bradley did not have any problem taking the job with an intern tag in the first place, if the money and situation were right, the idea that he would refuse to coach his son again is a bit much.

Greg Seltzer said...

Let me try again... Bradley is not coming back to the USMNT or going to any other NT at this time. Book it.

UnitedDemon said...

If Bob has learned to grow from year to year as a coach, well done. At this rate, wouldn't mind having him be coach again in, well, a few years.

Thing is, JK is good at Some things. Picking young players, subbing in others, getting us to try to attack a little more fluidly. That last one is controversial, but I stick with it.

Good job, Bob. Keep it up.

Tony M said...

"Bradley is not coming back to the USMNT"

Can't a guy dream?

Paul:

"these coaches don't have the required international experience or the record of improving a full squad from youth to first team"

I'm not sure how important the first requirement is and I don't think you recognize how narrow the second is. Arena and Bradley had no international experience, yet both delivered results that are on par (I'd argue better) than JKs. They did it by knowing their players well, knowing how to motivate them and getting them to buy into their roles. There are a handful of guys in MLS who could do the same.

As for improving a full squad from youth to first team... who's done that? Maybe Jose Perkerman with Argentina. JK hasn't, and he didn't at Germany. He brought in some (American) training methods and expanded the team to non-ethnic Germans (Ozil, Lowendoski, ect.) These were good things, but he didn't do anything like what suggest is a prerequisite for a Nat coach. The fact is, very few have

Paul Poenicke said...

@UnitedDemon: The USMNT has been developing a style, based on speed, quickly advancing the ball out of the midfield and into the attacking third, that, when combined with a successful pressing defense, was quite powerful against the Netherlands and Germany. The reason why everyone was so excited after seeing those two friendlies was because it seemed like JK's promises about playing a more attacking style of soccer almost seemed like it was coming true--almost, given the putrid display in the Gold Cup. When the US is on its game--a far too rare occurrence--the team plays much like the 2008 Russian team that took third in the Euros, with lots of pace, a fluid style that plays around defenders, and good interchange between midfielders and overlapping backs.

@Tony M: Bradley is a far superior human being to JK, but his vision and ability to take the USMNT forward is limited and inferior to JK. Unfortunately, the best evidence for JK--his record and the team's performance--is now inferior based on the Gold Cup; I would say the team's run under JK was slightly better than Bradley, and roughly on par with Arena, before the Gold Cup. His record with Germany is certainly one that other MLS coaches cannot touch--they do not have the depth of international experience and the proven record with a national team. You are correct that JK's ability to expand the German national team included bringing in new talent and using different training methods. His ability to improve the youth on the national team suggests he has the leadership and perception to advance the entire men's program. Whether this is the case will be evidenced by further games in October, along with the recent showing at the U-20 World Cup. At the very least he has demonstrated his strengths--bringing in new players, working with the youth--that he showed while with Germany. If we want to improve the national team, then any coach must be able to advance the program in a significant fashion, and JK has done this in the narrow scope of youth and dual nationals. The USMNT does not need a coach who "gets" US players: we need a coach who has the ability and record of advancing a national team. Klinsmann, for all of his faults, has demonstrated that ability.

However, I do question if he can get back to the program-best winning streak in 2013. Klinsmann demonstrated arrogance and obstinance at Bayern; the same qualities will get him fired for poor results if he cannot overcome his own limits and hire other coaches to improve his abilities. JK has his weaknesses, but one of his great strengths is to lean on others to overcome his faults. Let's see if he does this in the upcoming matches.